How Much Is A Leader’s Integrity Worth?

Hi Friends,

Thought I should share this with you all from the stable of Dr. Travis Bradley on Integrity.

From Enron to Volkswagen, we’ve watched in horror as leaders who lack integrity have destroyed businesses time and again. But the real tragedy happens when regular leaders, who are otherwise great, sabotage themselves, day after day, with mistakes that they can’t see but are obvious to everyone else.

In most cases, it’s slight and often unintentional gaps in integrity that hold leaders, their employees, and their companies back. Despite their potential, these leaders harm their employees and themselves.

“Look for three things in a person: intelligence, energy, and integrity. If they don’t have the last one, don’t even bother.” –Warren Buffet

Dr. Fred Kiel did the difficult job of quantifying the value of a leader’s integrity for his book, Return On Character, and his findings are fascinating. Over a seven-year period, Kiel collected data on 84 CEOs and compared employee ratings of their behavior to company performance.

Kiel found that high-integrity CEOs had a multi-year return of 9.4%, while low integrity CEOs had a yield of just 1.9%. What’s more, employee engagement was 26% higher in organizations led by high-integrity CEOs.

Kiel describes high-integrity CEOs this way: “They were often humble. They appeared to have very little concern for their career success or their compensation. The funny point about that is they all did better than the self-focused CEOs with regard to compensation and career success. It’s sort of ironic.”

Kiel’s data is clear: companies perform better under the guidance of high-integrity leadership. “Companies who try to compete under the leadership of a skilled but self-focused CEO are setting themselves up to lose,” Kiel says.

Every leader has the responsibility to hone his or her integrity. Many times, there are integrity traps that have a tendency to catch well-meaning leaders off guard. By studying these traps, we can all sharpen the saw and keep our leadership integrity at its highest possible level.

Fostering a cult of personality. It’s easy for leaders to get caught up in their own worlds as there are many systems in place that make it all about them. These leaders identify so strongly with their leadership roles that instead of remembering that the only reason they’re there is to serve others, they start thinking, ‘It’s my world, and we’ll do things my way.’ Being a good leader requires remembering that you’re there for a reason, and the reason certainly isn’t to have your way. High-integrity leaders not only welcome questioning and criticism, they insist on it.

Dodging accountability. Politicians are notorious for refusing to be accountable for their mistakes, and business leaders do it too. Even if only a few people see a leader’s misstep (instead of millions), dodging accountability can be incredibly damaging. A person who refuses to say “the buck stops here” really isn’t a leader at all. Being a leader requires being confident enough in your own decisions and those of your team to own them when they fail. The very best leaders take the blame but share the credit.

Lacking self-awareness. Many leaders think they have enough emotional intelligence (EQ). And many times, they are proficient in some EQ skills, but when it comes to understanding themselves, they are woefully blind. It’s not that they’re hypocrites; they just don’t see what everyone else sees. They might play favorites, be tough to work with, or receive criticism badly. And they aren’t alone, as TalentSmart research involving more than a million people shows that just 36% of us are accurate in our self-assessments.

Forgetting that communication is a two-way street. Many leaders also think that they’re great communicators, not realizing that they’re only communicating in one direction. Some pride themselves on being approachable and easily accessible, yet they don’t really hear the ideas that people share with them. Some leaders don’t set goals or provide context for the things they ask people to do, and others never offer feedback, leaving people wondering if they’re more likely to get promoted or fired.

Not firing poor performers. Sometimes, whether it’s because they feel sorry for an employee or simply because they want to avoid conflict, leaders dodge making the really tough decisions. While there’s certainly nothing wrong with being compassionate, real leaders know when it’s just not appropriate, and they understand that they owe it to the company and to the rest of the team to let someone go.

Succumbing to the tyranny of the urgent. The tyranny of the urgent is what happens when leaders spend their days putting out small fires. They take care of what’s dancing around in front of their faces and lose focus of what’s truly important—their people. Your integrity as a leader hinges upon your ability to avoid distractions that prevent you from putting your people first.

Micromanaging. You see this mistake most often with people who have recently worked their way up through the ranks. They still haven’t made the mental shift from doer to leader. Without something tangible to point to at the end of the day, they feel unproductive, not realizing that productivity means something different for a leader. As a result, they micromanage to the point of madness and fall off schedule. An important part of a leader’s integrity rests in giving people the freedom to do their jobs.

Bringing It All Together

The bad news is that these mistakes are as common as they are damaging. The good news is that they’re really easy to fix, once you’re aware of them.

Osteoporosis is a Feminist Issue! (Guest Post)

Do You Agree With This?
Drop your views

Fit Is a Feminist Issue

azarIn the past two years, since I started my PhD studies, my research has focused on osteoporosis and how modifiable exercise programs can prevent or slow down its progression. A requirement for PhD, before starting the actual thesis phase, is writing a literature review. Rading a high volume of research articles (up to 400-500) for a critical synthesis of literature would be the most daunting part. However, the review of literature helps the students to identify the strengths, weaknesses and gaps in previous work related to their own topic as a base.

Being at this stage, I read about osteoporosis from different angles to learn about facts, myths and contradictions.

To me, it has been very interesting to read about osteoporosis and how sex and gender differences attributed to bone structure can be addressed through a feminism lens.

So, apart from expanding my overall knowledge on osteoporosis, its symptoms, causes…

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Eating Disorders : A Battle With Self

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Hello Friend,

Last week I wrote about Eating Disorders. I tried as much as possible to explain the various eating disorders that are available. If you missed that, click Here

As promised this week, the major focus is how to detect the on-set of Anorexia nervosa as well as Bilumia nervosa.

Poor body image

Negative or obsessive thoughts about body size, a key factor in all eating disorders, can occur very early on in the disease, says Cynthia Bulik, PhD, an eating disorders specialist at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Warning signs of poor body image include negative self-talk (“I’m so fat,” “I have no self-control”) and misinterpreting other people’s remarks. “Comments like, ‘My, you have filled out nicely’ can be received as ‘You look fat,'” Bulik says. This body insecurity, she adds, sometimes emerges—or gets worse—when young girls compare themselves to idealized figures such as Disney princesses and rail-thin actresses.

Excessive exercise

Over-the-top workout habits—sometimes referred to as “exercise anorexia”—can go hand in hand with disordered eating and appear to be on the rise. Defining “excessive” exercise can be tricky, however, especially when dealing with athletes or highly active young people. (A recent study of high school students found a higher rate of eating disorders among female athletes than non-athletes, 14% versus 3%.)
Here are two warning signs : Does the person panic if they miss a day of exercise? And does he or she work out even when injured or sick? These are pretty good indices that things have gone too far.

Fear of eating in public

Feeling shy or self-conscious about eating in public can be related to body image issues—a person may feel that others are watching and judging, for instance. But it can also be an indication that eating, period, has become nerve-wracking. “Eating can be enormously anxiety-provoking for someone with an eating disorder,” Bulik says. “Doing it in public just compounds the enormity of the task.”

Although not wanting to eat around other people is a hallmark of anorexia, it can occur with all eating disorders. Even people with binge eating disorder will eat very small amounts when in public, then binge when alone.

Fine body hair

People who have been depriving their bodies of nutrition for extended periods of time often develop soft, downy body hair—almost a thin film of fur—on their arms and other parts of the body. This hair, known as lanugo, is a physical adaptation to the perilously low weight and loss of body fat seen in some people with anorexia.

“It is a symptom of starvation and [an] attempt by the body to keep itself warm,” says Bulik, the author of The Woman in the Mirror: How to Stop Confusing What You Look Like with Who You Are.

Unusual Flair for cooking for others

Although people with anorexia may refuse food themselves, they are often eager to see others eat, sometimes going so far as to prepare elaborate meals for friends and family. This may be a form of vicarious pleasure, or eating “through” others.

Similar behavior was observed in the famous Minnesota Starving Experiment, conducted in the mid-1940s. Volunteers who were semi-starved and lost more than 25% of their body weight became obsessed with food and eating. Several of the men became collectors of cookbooks and recipes, a behavior that has been noted in people with anorexia as well.

Dry skin

Dry and blotchy skin, stemming from dehydration, sometimes signals ongoing anorexia or bulimia. Frequent purging and laxatives can seriously dehydrate you.
Dry skin isn’t the only mark of dehydration in people with eating disorders. Dry mouth, sunken cheeks and eyes, and severe electrolyte imbalances also can occur.

Although eating disorders are increasing all over the world among both men and women, there is evidence to suggest that it is women in the Western world who are at the highest risk of developing them and the degree of westernization increases the risk

Another skin change that’s a telltale sign of bulimia, specifically, is the appearance of calluses on the knuckles. Known as Russell’s sign (after the psychiatrist who first described it), these lesions are caused by repeatedly scraping the back of the hand against one’s teeth while inducing vomiting.

Feeling cold

A result of malnutrition and low body fat, feeling cold is a symptom more often associated with anorexia than with bulimia or binge eating disorder. Frequently complaining about being cold or wearing sweaters and other heavy clothing even in mild weather are common tip-offs in people with eating disorders.
Body fat stores energy and helps the body withstand cold. People with too little body fat can therefore have difficulty maintaining their body temperature, and in some cases may even develop hypothermia.

P.S: this doesn’t mean anyone who’s always cold is anorexia prone

Puffy cheeks

Swelling along the jawline is primarily associated with bulimia but can occur with any eating disorder in which purging is present. (Some people with anorexia purge to stay thin. Unlike people with anorexia, people with bulimia are often of normal weight, or even above-normal weight.)
The puffy cheeks are a result of swollen salivary glands (parotid glands). The swelling can happen at any stage of the illness and depends on the person and how often they purge.

Fixating on ‘safe’ foods

A preoccupation with foods deemed to be “safe” or “healthy” is the hallmark of a condition that has come to be known as orthorexia. Although not an official diagnosis, orthorexia can sometimes be a stepping-stone to full-blown anorexia nervosa.
Although people with orthorexia tend to focus on the quality of food and people with anorexia tend to focus on quantity, the two conditions sometimes overlap. Some people with anorexia, for instance, have a very limited diet and prefer to eat the same foods over and over. When people are going down the path toward an eating disorder, one of the early signs is cutting out foods they used to like, or even entire food groups

 Eating rituals

Compulsive behaviors similar to those seen in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can also appear with eating disorders. These so-called rituals can take the form of cutting food into tiny morsels, or arranging food in certain patterns. They are mainly associated with anorexia (which often occurs alongside OCD), but they are sometimes an early sign of binge eating disorder as well.
Rituals are both a tactic not to eat and also a piece of the obsessionality associated with anorexia nervosa. When eating disorders are starting, people will try to make it look like they are eating by cutting things up and shifting food around on the plate so as not to draw attention to how little they are eating.

Lastly,

Strange food combinations

Binge eaters are known to prepare dishes using an odd mixture of ingredients, such as mashed potatoes and Oreo cookies, or potato chips with lemon, pork rinds, Italian dressing, and salt. A recent study found that people who create their own food concoctions are more likely to binge than people who simply overeat.
Often, though, this behavior takes place in private and becomes yet another thing for the person with the disorder to feel ashamed about. That shame and disgust can aggravate the disorder, the study authors write.

In my next write up, I shall talk about how not to give up in case you have these

For questions, please contact me via any of the various platforms listed below.

...AS MUCH AS YOU CAN, STAY HEALTHY

NIGERIAN WRITER AWARDS 2015

Okay..I am here again to seek your nominations
Thanks for the previous one but I am not tired of winning yet and this is very important and dear to me.
Please nominate me as HEALTH WRITER OF THE YEAR in the NIGERIAN WRITERS AWARD 2015. HERE IS THE LINK http://nigerianwritersawards.com/pg33nn.html.
Thank you

Eating Disorder: A vicious cycle of Self Abuse

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Eating Disorders are psychological illnesses defined by abnormal eating habits that may involve either insufficient or excessive food intake to the detriment of an individual’s physical and mental health.  Bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa are the most common specific forms of eating disorders. Other types of eating disorders include binge eating disorder and OSFED (Other Specified Feeding and Eating Disorder).

Some eating disorder signs are obvious: dramatic weight loss, a refusal to eat, retreating to the bathroom for long periods after meals. But anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder also reveal themselves in more subtle ways.

Common Amongst them are:

Anorexia nervosa : is characterized by an abnormally low body weight, intense fear of gaining weight, and a distorted perception of weight or shape. People with anorexia use extreme efforts to control their weight and shape, which often significantly interferes with their health and life activities.

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Cyclic Progression of Anorexia nervosa

Bulimia nervosa : When you have bulimia, you have episodes of bingeing and purging that involve feeling a lack of control over your eating. Many people with bulimia also restrict their eating during the day, which often leads to more binge eating and purging. Purging can include self-induced vomiting, over-exercising, and the usage of diuretics, enemas, and laxatives

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courtesy..Anabell

Binge-eating disorder : is  when you regularly eat too much food (binge) and feel a lack of control over your eating. You may eat quickly or eat more food than intended, even when you’re not hungry, and you may continue eating even long after you’re uncomfortably full.

Others include..

Pica : Pica is persistently eating nonfood items, such as soap, cloth, talcum powder or dirt, over a period of at least one month. Eating such substances is not appropriate for the person’s developmental level and not part of a specific cultural or social practice.

Persistently eating these nonfood items can result in medical complications such as poisoning, intestinal problems or infections. Pica often occurs along with other disorders such as autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability.

Rumination disorder: Rumination disorder is repeatedly and persistently regurgitating food after eating, but it’s not due to a medical condition or another eating disorder such as anorexia, bulimia or binge-eating disorder. Food is brought back up into the mouth without nausea or gagging. Sometimes regurgitated food is re-chewed and re-swallowed or spit out.

The disorder may result in malnutrition if the food is spit out or if the person eats significantly less to prevent the behavior. The occurrence of rumination disorder may be more common in infancy or in people who have an intellectual disability.

Avoidance/restrictive food intake disorder : This disorder is characterized by failing to meet your minimum daily nutrition requirements because you don’t have an interest in eating; you avoid food with certain sensory characteristics, such as color, texture, smell or taste; or you’re concerned about the consequences of eating, such as fear of choking. Food is not avoided because of fear of gaining weight.

The disorder can result in significant weight loss or failure to gain weight in childhood, as well as nutritional deficiencies that can cause health problems.

Avoidance/restrictive food intake disorder is not diagnosed when symptoms are part of another eating disorder, such as anorexia, or part of a medical problem or other mental disorder

eating-disorder-charts

The precise cause of eating disorders is not entirely understood, but there is evidence that it may be linked to other medical conditions and situations. Cultural idealization of thinness and youthfulness have contributed to eating disorders affecting diverse populations.

Although eating disorders are increasing all over the world among both men and women, there is evidence to suggest that it is women in the Western world who are at the highest risk of developing them and the degree of westernization increases the risk. While proper treatment can be highly effective for many suffering from specific types of eating disorders, the consequences of eating disorders can be severe, including death (whether from direct medical effects of disturbed eating habits or from comorbid conditions such as suicidal thinking).

How can you tell if a friend or family member is at risk?

Watch out in the next post.

A Letter of Regret From Your Anxious and Depressed Friend

Share your thoughts after reading. Feel free to contact me if you’re in such a state of mind

talkingthisandthat

Dear Friend,

I was not always this way.

I did not always hide away from the general public for months or weeks at a time. Once I was quite confident. I occasionally felt happy. I had a full time job and I could face customers with no concern. I would chat to people over the phone, make an effort to see friends, be interested in daily life. I could cope with negativity. Overcome it, even. I wouldn’t let anything bring me down because I had something inside me that made me keep going out there, into the world, facing it all.

But sometimes, Friend, things happen. Sometimes just one thing. Sometimes many things. The courage to face these things is strong at first, at least stronger than now. But depending on luck, or coincidence, or fate, or opportunity, eventually the voice of that courage for some people is quieter. Weaker…

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Gone is the face we loved so dear….

Sometimes we have to break protocols. Those protocols are important but you have to break them for more important reasons. It was June 11 that it happened.

Having gone through the pains of cancer for more than 4 weeks, she could no longer bear it and hence gave up the ghost. I however chose June 14 as my own official date because the actual date (June 11th) happened to be my friend’s birthday.
Ten years down the line, I can say the memory seems fresh. People come and people go . The leaving of some is celebrated while for some others it is not.
Hers wasn’t celebrated and I remember with nostalgia how i felt that night I was told that she has gone to be with her maker. lool…sounded like a script to me and didn’t dawn on me until the following week when she was laid into the tomb.
So today, I choose to celebrated the woman who birthed me into this world.

Here are my thought this year:

Time speeds on, (ten) years have passed since the death its gloom, its shadows cast. Within our home, where all seemed bright, and took from us a shining light. We miss that light, and ever will; her vacant place there’s none to fill. Down here to mourn, but not in vain, for up in Heaven we will meet again.

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Remembrance is a gold chain death tries to break but all in vain. To have, to love and then to part is the great sorrow of one’s heart. The years may wipe out many things, but this they wipe out never – the memory of those happy days, when we were all together.

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No one knows how much we miss you, no one knows the bitter pain we have suffered since we lost you, life has never been the same. In our hearts your memory lingers, sweetly tender, fond and true. There is not a day, dear mother, which we do not think of you. We are sad within our memory, lonely are our hearts today. For the one we loved so dearly has forever been called away. We think of her in silence, no eye may see us weep, but many silent tears are shed while others are asleep.
Ten years have passed since that sad day, when one we loved was called away. God took her home – it was His will, within our hearts she lives still.
Some day we hope to meet you, some day we know not when. We shall meet in a better land and never part again.
Gone is the face we loved so dear, silent is the voice we loved to hear. Too far away for sight or speech, but not too far for thought to reach. Sweet to remember him who once was here and who, though absent, is just as dear. No stain was on her little heart, sin had not entered there. And innocence slept sweetly on that pale white brow so fair. She was too pure for this cold earth, too beautiful to stay. And so God’s holy angel bore our darling one away.

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There is a link death cannot sever. Love and Remembrance last forever
We cannot, Lord, Thy purpose see, but all is well that’s done by Thee
Yes, we all live to God! Father, Thy chastening rod so help us. Thine afflicted ones to bear. That in the spirit land, meeting at Thy right hand, ’twill be our Heaven to find that… she is there!

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Sleep On Faith Iyabode Adebayo (Dec.17, 1966-June 11, 2005)

An Overview on Pain

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The International Association for the Study of Pain‘s widely used definition states: “Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage.

Pain motivates the individual to withdraw from damaging situations, to protect a damaged body part while it heals, and to avoid similar experiences in the future. Most pain resolves promptly once the painful stimulus is removed and the body has healed, but sometimes pain persists despite removal of the stimulus and apparent healing of the body; and sometimes pain arises in the absence of any detectable stimulus, damage or disease.

DURATION

Pain is usually transitory, lasting only until the noxious stimulus is removed or the underlying damage or pathology has healed, but some painful conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritisperipheral neuropathycancer and idiopathic pain, may persist for years. Pain that lasts a long time is called chronic, and pain that resolves quickly is called acute. Traditionally, the distinction between acute and chronic pain has relied upon an arbitrary interval of time from onset; the two most commonly used markers being 3 months and 6 months since the onset of pain, though some theorists and researchers have placed the transition from acute to chronic pain at 12 months. Others apply acute to pain that lasts less than 30 days, chronic to pain of more than six months duration, and subacute to pain that lasts from one to six months. A popular alternative definition of chronic pain, involving no arbitrarily fixed durations is “pain that extends beyond the expected period of healing”.Chronic pain may be classified as cancer pain or benign.

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THRESHOLDS

In pain science, thresholds are measured by gradually increasing the intensity of a stimulus such as electric current or heat applied to the body. The pain perception threshold is the point at which the stimulus begins to hurt, and the pain tolerance threshold is reached when the subject acts to stop the pain.

Differences in pain perception and tolerance thresholds are associated with, among other factors, ethnicity, genetics, and sex. People of Mediterranean origin report as painful some radiant heat intensities that northern Europeans describe as nonpainful, and Italian women tolerate less intense electric shock than Jewish or Native American women. Some individuals in all cultures have significantly higher than normal pain perception and tolerance thresholds. For instance, patients who experience painless heart attacks have higher pain thresholds for electric shock and muscle cramp

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New Alzheimer’s drug to enter clinical trials

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A new drug developed at Lancaster University that may help to prevent the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease is to enter clinical trials.

The number of people with dementia is steadily increasing. Currently there are about 850,000 cases in the UK, with numbers expected to reach over a million by 2021. The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease. It begins when a protein called beta-amyloid forms senile plaques that start to clump together in the brain, damaging nerve cells and leading to memory loss and confusion.

David Allsop, Professor of Neuroscience, and Dr Mark Taylor, from the Faculty of Health and Medicine, have developed a new drug which in laboratory tests reduces the number of these senile plaques and the amount of brain inflammation and oxidative damage associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Lancaster University has filed a patent application for the drug, and it will be progressing into clinical trials run by the north-west research company MAC Clinical Research. If it passes regulatory hurdles, the ultimate aim is to give the drug to people with mild symptoms of memory loss.

Professor Allsop said: “It is encouraging that our drug is being taken forward and will be tested on humans.

“Many people who are mildly forgetful may go on to develop the disease because senile plaques start forming years before any symptoms manifest themselves. The ultimate aim is to give the drug at that stage, to stop any more damage to the brain.”

Professor Allsop was the first scientist to isolate senile plaques from the human brain.

Dr Steve Higham, Chief Operating Officer of MAC Clinical Research said: “Preventing Alzheimer’s disease progression remains a critical unmet need for millions of people worldwide. With that in mind we are very pleased to begin this exciting partnership with Professor David Allsop, his team and Lancaster University.”

Dr James Pickett, Head of Research at Alzheimer’s Society which currently funds the research, said: “There’s a tremendous need for new treatments that can stop the development of dementia in its tracks. Trials in people are an essential step in the development of any new drug so it’s really positive to see this promising research being taken forward.

“Alzheimer’s Society will continue to fund drug development research like this to ensure the best new treatments reach the people who desperately need them as soon as possible.”

Other contributing researchers include groups led by Lancaster University’s Professor Christian Hölscher (formerly of Ulster University) and Professor Massimo Masserini at University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy.

Lancaster University launched the “Defying Dementia” campaign earlier this year, in order to raise awareness of Alzheimer’s and the new drug, and to raise funds for further research.

Perhaps hope is raised for the treatment of this condition

courtesy: http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/news/articles/2015/new-alzheimers-drug-to-enter-clinical-trials/

Untreated Diabetes: What Can Happen and Where You Can Get Help

People who have diabetes seem to live somewhat normal, healthy lives – with the inconvenience of having to manage their blood sugar levels. One unfortunate side effect of this is that some diabetics, especially younger people who feel the invincibility of youth, may feel that “it’s no big deal” and leave their diabetes untreated.

A 2012 study from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality found that 2.4 percent of respondents with diabetes did not use insulin, take oral medication, or follow a healthy diet. Essentially, these people are letting diabetes “take its course.” So what can they expect in the future with untreated diabetes?

What Can Happen

Left untreated, diabetes can affect your long-term health in catastrophic ways. The most serious long-term effects are heart disease and possible kidney-failure. However, there can also be damage to your blood vessels and your eyes. Diabetic ketoacidosis, during which the body breaks down fat stores because it can no longer process sugar, is another serious health complication that can occur. And while mortality is inevitable for all of us, people who do not treat their diabetes will most likely die as a result of one complication or another.

Untreated diabetes can result in both temporary and permanent blindness. There can also be nerve damage in the extremities – typically the hands and feet – which can lead to infection, gangrene and amputation. Along with heart disease and kidney failure, untreated diabetes can also lead to stroke and paralysis.

Where You Can Get Help

Interestingly, the AHRQ study found that very few respondents thought that diabetes was “no big deal,” but instead did not treat diabetes for economic reasons. They either lacked insurance or enough income to adhere to a diabetic diet, opting instead for cheap, sugary processed foods.

If you are not treating diabetes for economic reasons, there are a number of options at your disposal. If your doctor (or any doctor) can’t provide deferred or reduced payments for diabetes treatment, check with local hospitals that might provide “compassionate care.”

DO NOT JOKE WITH DIABETES

Credit :http://www.informationaboutdiabetes.com/